Physics Experiments

Katsumi SENYO Lecturer

Department: Institute of Liberal Arts & Sciences

Class Time: 2010 Spring Monday
Recommended for: School of Medicine

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Course Aims

Nowadays, knowledge of physics such as radioactive rays, electronic measuring instruments, high magnetic fields and superconductivity is becoming important in the field of medical technology. Therefore, one of the main objectives of this course is to acquire fundamental knowledge by coming to understand the underlying concepts of physics through laboratory experiments in which you will observe physical phenomena and measure physical parameters. In addition, methodologies for recording, analysis and representation of measured data will be introduced during exercise sessions.

Teacher's Tips

As many of you may not have had much experience of experiments in junior high school and high school, you might be excited and, at the same time, concerned about performing an experiment on your own as a researcher. Here in Nagoya University, we offer a physics experiments course, where you can get hands-on experience of fundamental physics experiments. Most of the experiments are related to high school level physics and the phenomena you see around yourselves everyday. We would like you to understand the methodology of experiments and how to compare the experimental results with the physical theory, and also wish you to acquire a basic idea of what it will be like to perform experiments in your future career as a researcher.

It is highly recommended that you preview and review the course material in order to get a clear understanding of the course.

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Course Requirements and Recommended Courses

This course is designed for the school of Medicine and the school of Health Sciences. It is preferable to take this course preceded or accompanied by the lectures on mechanics, electromagnetism, fundamental physics I and fundamental physics II. However, if you have a basic understanding of physics to high school level, you will be allowed to take this course without the prerequisites.

Contents

The schedule for the experiments and exercises are as follows. The first meeting of this course will be a guidance and exercise session.

Experiments

  1. Gravity: Measurement of the gravity constant using a rigid pendulum.
  2. Motion of electrons in a magnetic field: Observation of the motion of electrons in a uniform magnetic field, measurements of specific charge and the relation of electron orbital radius to accelerating voltage and to the strength of a magnetic field.
  3. Equipotential lines: Observation of equipotential lines and lines of electrical force when applying a steady current to aluminum foil.
  4. Superconductivity and resistance: Observation of resistance at extremely low temperatures, and the Meissner effect.
  5. Measurements of the wavelength of light using diffractive grating: Measurement of the line spectrum of a cadmium atom.
  6. Radioactivity measurement: Measurement of radioactivity of the beta ray using a GM counter tube, and observation of the statistical properties.
  7. Oscilloscope: Understanding the usage of the oscilloscope, such as observation of voltage, frequency, phase and Lissajous figure and measurements of the phase shift of an RC circuit.
  8. Resonance phenomena of electrical circuit: Observation of resonance of an LCR circuit, measurements of the influence of the frequency of input signals on the resonance curve of amplitude and phase difference of the output signal.

Exercises

  1. Units, significant values, numerical calculations and estimation of the uncertainties of measuring instruments.
  2. Propagation of uncertainties, data analysis, graphical representation and the method of least squares.

Related Resources

Videos of some physics experiments are available. Even though it does not cover all the material of the experiments, it may be useful to watch these videos for preview. Here is the link to the videos.

Precautions

White lab coat and safety glasses are not necessary. Wear comfortable clothes such as T-shirts and jeans so that you can focus on your experiments. Be sure to bring your textbook, safety guide book, experiment notebook and scientific calculator. Beforehand, read the corresponding part of the textbook to get a basic idea of the upcoming experiment.

Course Schedule

The schedule for the experiments and exercises are as follows. The first meeting of this course will be a guidance and exercise session.

  1. Gravity: Measurement of the gravity constant using a rigid pendulum.
  2. Motion of electrons in a magnetic field: Observation of the motion of electrons in a uniform magnetic field, measurements of specific charge and the relation of electron orbital radius to accelerating voltage and to the strength of a magnetic field.
  3. Equipotential lines: Observation of equipotential lines and lines of electrical force when applying a steady current to aluminum foil.
  4. Superconductivity and resistance: Observation of resistance at extremely low temperatures, and the Meissner effect.
  5. Measurements of the wavelength of light using diffractive grating: Measurement of the line spectrum of a cadmium atom.
  6. Radioactivity measurement: Measurement of radioactivity of the beta ray using a GM counter tube, and observation of the statistical properties.
  7. Oscilloscope: Understanding the usage of the oscilloscope, such as observation of voltage, frequency, phase and Lissajous figure and measurements of the phase shift of an RC circuit.
  8. Resonance phenomena of electrical circuit: Observation of resonance of an LCR circuit, measurements of the influence of the frequency of input signals on the resonance curve of amplitude and phase difference of the output signal.

Grading

You will be evaluated based on attendance, attitude and reports. Since this course consists of laboratory experiments, attendance is mandatory. If you are absent more than three times, you will not be given credit for this course. It is advisable to consult with the professor if you cannot attend some of the classes due to unavoidable circumstances.

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Lecture Handouts

Note: All files are in Japanese.

Video of the experiments

Click on the play button to watch the videos. All files are Flash Video.

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Page last updated April 18, 2017

The class contents were most recently updated on the date indicated. Please be aware that there may be some changes between the most recent year and the current page.

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